STRIPLV0417

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Striplv Magazine - The Sexiest Magazine on the Planet, Issue 0417

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Keen’s background in gymnastics and aerial arts helped her master the fight choreography, and Jackman was wowed by his young co-star. Dafne did most of her fighting in the film, he says. She worked hard. When I say work, she loved it. She didn’t want to leave stunt training. I looked over one day, and she had my claws on, and she was beaming. The other actors and filmmakers were like family to me, Keen says. I felt safe. I was always more focused on my character and what her longing for a normal family life which is what she is so desperately fighting for. While Laura may be a killer, she’s still a little girl, a fact that is most evident in her wardrobe. For Laura, she starts out with a very simple and monotone look, explains Emmy®-winning costumer designer, Daniel Orlandi. She looks like a prisoner who’s escaped. Then when she gets to pick out her clothes we see this ruthless killer who loves violence pick out a unicorn T-shirt along with pink accessories. It really adds a sweet irony to her character. For the other major characters, Orlandi took his inspirational cues from classic Westerns and film noirs. Jim said from the beginning he did not want any of our characters to look like they were in superhero costumes or anything too pronounced. Logan is seen half-heartedly wearing a cheap black suit jacket with an old black pair of Levis only because that’s his driver uniform. But once Logan is on the run he picks an outfit that is a suede western style jacket and a cowboy shirt—all dark and simple. He’s on the run and doesn’t want to stand out, Orlandi says. HUGH JACKMAN 3 QUESTIONS STRIPLV: Will you tell us about Logan, if there’s a different side of him we get to see? JACKMAN: Oh, yeah, I think the whole film feels different in tone, character, and any of the others and that was sort of our goal. I didn’t want it to feel like a final chapter of a saga, but a whole, fresh, and new thing; stake some new ground. Logan in this film is more human, hence the title. He’s sick; he’s healing. His powers are dwindling; he’s vulnerable. He’s also looking after an aging father figure in Charles Xavier and hiding him out. He’s under stress, he doesn’t have money. He’s a limo driver, trying to earn enough bucks to get by, to buy the meds Charles needs. It’s very mundane, very normal kind of stuff going on, but clearly, he’s checked out, he’s at the bottom. And so what James Mangle and Scott Frank did was kind of create a world of someone who’s biggest fear is love and intimacy, because it only brings pain. Then surrounding him with a family, forced upon him. STRIPLV: Tell us about those relationships. JACKMAN: So Charles has got dementia and Charles, who’s been a father figure, mentor, probably understands him and knows him best, because he’s a closed book, Logan. He quips, and he’s tough and all that. Charles knows where he comes from; his background, and knows the demons he’s fighting. So he knows him, but in this one, the tables are turned a bit, he has dementia, so he’s confused, and he’s vulnerable, and he’s angry. He’s many, many different things: child-like, abusive, and Logan is sort of in a caretaker role, taking care of him day in and day out, and also keeping him hidden from authorities. So it’s a great dynamic, very fun to play with my great friend and one of the greatest actors, I’ve ever met. The young girl who is created from DNA and it becomes clear that that DNA may very much resemble my own, which was stolen, so it’s not like he chose to have a daughter or anything like that. He’s confronted with genetics very similar to his own and a task to rescue, save, and protect her. He doesn’t want that task, and he pushes it away for as long as he can. But that relationship between those two characters, sort of father and daughter, is I think very strong and this young girl, Dafne, who plays her part, is absolutely astonishing. STRIPLV: Do you have any hopes concerning what fans will take away from the film after seeing it? JACKMAN: My goal from this, because I talk to fans every day of my life, every second day at least, for the last 17 years, is that every one of them, because I know they know, and they say it to me all the time, after they see the movie, they say to me, “That is the Wolverine movie we’ve been waiting to see.” So that’s my hope, that’s my dream, and that was the guiding star really to making this movie.

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